skip to Main Content

Welcome

Our new location is in Blue Ash Ohio. We moved our marketing agency from Cincinnati's Over the Rhine in December of 2019. If you would like to arrange a meeting, please call us at (513) 463-3429. In order to keep our employees healthy and safe, walk-ins are not currently welcome.

Get In Touch

Phone: (513) 463-3429
Address: 11223 Cornell Park Drive Suite 301, Blue Ash Ohio 45242

Our Location

Lohre Industrial Marketing Location

Lohre & Assoc. Welcomes Noted Artist and Web Designer Myke Amend to its Team

Web Design and Web Development Guru, Grphic Artist and Graphic Designer, Myke AmendCincinnati native Myke Amend recently joined Lohre & Associates, the Over-the-Rhine-based marketing communications agency, fulltime as Web Design & Internet Development creative officer. Amend has worked with Lohre for the past 10 years as a web designer and web developer on a freelance basis from Grand Rapids, Mich.

Amend, who returns to Cincinnati for the new position, brings two decades experience as a graphic designer, web designer, programmer, and Internet developer, working on a variety of business-to-business and consumer accounts. Additionally, Amend is an illustrator, engraver and painter, whose work has been commissioned by other artists in film, music and literature.

“We’re very excited to have Myke working with us,” says Chuck Lohre, president, “He brings the creativity and skills of a fine artist, with his vast digital expertise. It’s a perfect combination for our agency, which is known for creative solutions to the wide variety of branding, strategy and digital implementation projects we handle for our clients.”

Adds Amend, “It’s gratifying to know Chuck and his team of designers, writers, strategists and brand experts welcome the years of experience I bring from fine arts with the in-demand digital know-how. I’m excited to develop ways we can continue to solve challenges for the companies who have looked to Lohre for ways to set them apart from their competitors.”

Amend’s illustrations have been featured in “Weird Tales” magazine, “Beneath Ceaseless Skies,” “Gatehouse Gazette,” “Kilter” magazine, “Gothic Beauty” magazine, the art collection “Gothic Art Now,” the art collection “Vampire Art Now,” the “Airship Pirates RPG” and many more print publications as well as popular online resources such as “IO9,” “Elfwood,” “Dark Roasted Blend,” “Fantasy Art” magazine, “Lines and Colors,” “Brass Goggles,” “Gawker, “BoingBoing.” His work has also been featured on the sites of literary creatives including Warren Ellis, Thomas Ligotti, Neil Gaiman and Clive Barker.

Additionally Dexter Palmer, Cherie Priest, The Pickled Brothers Sideshow, Vernian Process, Veronique Chevalier, the Borgia Popes, Automaton, Abney Park and others have commissioned Amend for works. He is often a special guest of art, horror and steampunk conventions. He also works in sculpture and kinetic art, most notably having created a 4000-lb. solar and wind-powered rotating mural and 3D work called “the Infernal Device,” which was displayed at the Gerald R. Ford Museum for ArtPrize 2011.

In between Myke has filled his time working on ModelARestorers.org, as sole designer, webmaster, and server admin of a site serving 180 chapters Worldwide, creating advertising art for Disney Fine Art Gallery, and of course working for Lohre and Associates, for whom he now works full time.

Read More

The Industrial Marketing Trade Show Dance at CONEXPO

Everyone in the industrial market knows that the CONEXPO-CONAGG 2014 show is coming up in March. The conference will be in Las Vegas from March 4-8 and is expecting over 125,000 attendees and 2,400 exhibitors. In terms of a conference, that is huge and provides quite the opportunity for any business.

Read More

Kick Ass LEED Platinum Green Marketing

We compare NYC’s Frye store with Lohre & Assoc.’s LEED Platinum Commercial Interiors

Yesterday we visited the Frye store in NYC’s SoHo neighborhood. You might recognize Frye’s heritage as a shoe and bootmaker, but today it’s a lifestyle fashion brand. The Spring Street store serves as one of its flagship locations and this particular one earned LEED Platinum. The store manager didn’t know much about the LEED certification (and the store doesn’t point out its LEED status through graphics), so we enjoyed filling him in on what we saw and suspected. Both Lohre & Assoc. and Frye obtained LEED Platinum under v2009 so it’s a direct comparison. Using credit sheets for each, we were able to quickly scan and compare the projects.

Read More

Environmental Consulting Career Advice

This was posted at PM Environmental Consulting‘s site. Chuck Lohre was invited to contribute.

We realize that many students are interested in a career in environmental consulting. However, we found that there weren’t a tremendous amount of practical resources where students could learn more about what a career in this field would look like. With that in mind, we asked some successful professionals their thoughts on career paths, advice on classes, starting positions and much more. 

Question 1 

If a student were looking to get into environmental consulting, what courses should they focus on and what skills should will be most valuable in the industry and most important in helping them succeed?
 
It depends what type of consulting they are interested in. The environmental sector is really broad, and is probably going to continue to spread into different areas in the future. Clean Tech, Supply Chain, Environmental/Green Design, Sustainable Business Practices, etc. all have different areas of expertise; but, in general I would say focus on the hard skills (math, science, design, engineering, environmental economics, etc) that pertain to your area of interest. These are more marketable, are likely going to pay more, and are more difficult to learn/master once you are out of a college environment.
A. Lauren Abele
COO, Pipeline Fellowship
 
Students looking to enter the environmental consulting industry should do their research and determine what aspect of environmental consulting they are interested in making a career.  If environmental due diligence (i.e. Phase I ESA, Phase II ESA, etc.) is the area of consulting students wish to get into, students should focus on environmental policy, environmental chemistry, geology/hydrology, and writing courses. Most courses are not going to cover the basics of writing a Phase I or Phase II ESA, however, if you have a good background in the policy and science involved, you will stand out as an applicant and consultant. 
Kristin Dawkins
Staff Consultant, PM Environmental
 
The environmental due diligence consulting that we do at AEI is primarily related to helping people evaluate property for the presence of contamination – it’s a bit like environmental detective work.  Environmental history plays a role in understanding how land use can affect property with legacy issues.  Geology and hydrogeology are important in regards to subsurface sampling and remediation of soil, soil vapor and groundwater.  GIS and geography can help with the presentation of the information that we gather.  One of the most important skills in environmental consulting, in my view, is the ability to take complex information and present it in a well-written, easily understandable format for the layperson.  Conducting research and preparing written findings of your research is one of the most important skills you gain during your studies. 
 Holly Neber
President and a principal at AEI Consultants
 
There are many branches of environmental engineering. Examples include water (potable) and wastewater plant construction, operation and management, infrastructure impact planning, mining operation amelioration, energy conservation, etc. Other aspects include helping governments in the US and overseas develop environmental legislation and regulations for industrial, commercial and residential polluters or those industries that specialize in pollution cleanup. 

In addition to technical courses, students should take a foreign language, economics, accounting or finance, political science/government, sociology and writing because consultants are required to be conversant with a range of issues and comfortable communicating with diverse groups of stakeholders.

Carla Sydney Stone
Founder & Principal, International Development & Technical Assistance, LLC
 
Earth science, biology, chemistry, and public policy. Learn to write an intelligible report, unlike what engineers tend to crank out. Read “The Elements of Style” by Strunk & White, or some other such manual..
Bob Carlson
President, Green Knight Environmental
 
LEED AP then work on energy modeling and audits that show how to pay for improvements.
Chuck Lohre
Green Cincinnati Education Advocacy
Question 2
If there is such a thing as a “typical career path” what would it look like?
 
Internship, associate, manager, director….I’d say that the corporate ladder in the environmental sector is much the same as anywhere else. Which sector you are working in will dictate a bit of how that path looks, and many people in the environmental field cross sectors throughout their career. 
A. Lauren Abele
COO, Pipeline Fellowship
 
A typical career path starts out with an internship or entry level consultant.  The next step depends on the specific type of consulting and the company you are working for.  You may transition to a project manager and find that is best for you, or you may have management opportunities and find that is the career path for you. 
Kristin Dawkins
Staff Consultant, PM Environmental
 
In the environmental due diligence field, people generally start out assisting with field work or research under the guidance of a Project Manager.  They then grow into a Project Manager role where they are responsible for all aspects of the project.  Over time, they can progress towards more senior roles such as managing teams of Project Managers and providing technical expertise and working with clients directly. 
Holly Neber
President and a principal at AEI Consultants
 
A.
In an entry level position, what types of tasks and responsibilities should a student expect to take on?
 
Sector (public, private, or nonprofit) and business size (large, medium, small) will play a large role in terms of what types of tasks and responsibilities an entry level employee will be faced with. In general, larger agencies tend to have more structured roles, opportunities, and larger budgets. Smaller companies and nonprofits tend to have more diverse needs, less structure, and less disposable income. Both of these can have pros and cons, depending on what your goals and needs are. I would say that after looking at sector and business size, the next variable is your manager or managing team. These people, and their working styles, will usually play a big role in terms of what responsibilities will be delegated to you and/or how open your managing team is to you taking initiative as a new hire.
A. Lauren Abele
COO, Pipeline Fellowship
 
Entry level tasks will focus on learning and building on various aspects of the area of consulting you have chosen.  The training period can vary, and within our company the first year is considered your training period. You will help with research, site visits, information gathering, report writing and preparation, and client communications. All of these will build on each other and as you become more skilled, the projects you are working on will increase in difficulty. As an entry level employee, you should take this time to ask questions and absorb as much information as you can from senior staff members because you will be able to apply all of that information to future projects. 
Kristin Dawkins
Staff Consultant, PM Environmental
 
Example tasks would be conducting site research at local agencies or conducting soil or groundwater sampling at the site.
Holly Neber
President and a principal at AEI Consultants
 
Most beginning engineers are assigned to a mixture of duties and projects that will teach them the basics of the industry in which they have chosen to work. They will hone their skills as mining engineers, dam designers, energy auditors, etc. They also may be asked to take some accounting or finance courses if they have not done so as undergraduates to prepare them for preparing budgets or capital justifications. They may be asked to go into the field to conduct environmental assessments. In most cases, the work, while interesting, is not glamorous. They may spend several years as part of a team conducting a survey of the water and geological resources in a site scheduled for development.
Carla Sydney Stone
Founder & Principal, International Development & Technical Assistance, LLC
 
Grunt work, carrying gear around, helping more senior staff finish reports.
Bob Carlson
President, Green Knight Environmental
 
B. 
What kinds of varying positions / jobs / experiences should a new hire seek out to become well-rounded as an environmental consultant and make them marketable in the industry?
 
In environmental work, I would say seek out projects/jobs/roles that allow you to flex some of those skills (math, science, design, engineering, sales, networking, legal work, etc)–especially skills that you can quantify and talk about in a resume. Project management, which many young environmental professionals do, can be a bit vague. It can be a hard sell. You should learn to back that up with either technical skills (that you can demonstrate you have used at work) or soft skills (Are you a good networker? Do you write really professional emails? Can people refer you to others?). Word of mouth, and having a great network, are really important in the professional world. Of course, in order for your network to work for you, you also have to be good at what you do. 
If you want to work abroad, you should definitely spend several months in that area–either as a volunteer or in a paid capacity. If you want to work in or with a country that speaks a foreign language, you should also speak that language. 

Working in different sectors–maybe even all of them–would also be great. Unlike other industries, environmental issues cross all three sectors. Having experience working at a nonprofit, government agency, and for profit will give you insider knowledge about culture and operations of each of these types of businesses. It can also be very attractive on your resume, depending on what a particular job is looking for.

For me, when considering potential hires for entry level positions at a social venture startup, these two main things have popped up as “issues”: (1) This person does not have the hard skills and/or experience we need for this specific project and (2) This person does not have the soft skills we need for someone to be a part of our team (they are a bit awkward, don’t feel comfortable networking, their emails are a bit odd and unprofessional sounding). These soft skills will not be taught in school, you kind of have to learn by doing… and the earlier you start, the better.

A. Lauren Abele
COO, Pipeline Fellowship
 
Internships are valuable experiences and stand out on a resume and application. If you know your career path early in your college career, you should seek out internships with similar skills. As we all know, you do not necessarily know what your career path will be until your last year in college or even after you graduate. However, internships are still very important and will provide you with valuable skills that you will be able to apply to a future career. If you are unsure of your future path in the environmental industry, seek out a range of internships that include field work, data collection, report writing, etc. Any of these can be applied to an environmental consulting career.  
Kristin Dawkins
Staff Consultant, PM Environmental
 
Conducting Phase I Environmental Site Assessment research is a good place to start because you get exposed to the regulatory oversight agencies and reviewing the other phases of work that often occur (Phase II investigations and remediation projects).   However, it is a mistake to think of a Phase I position as an entry-level job.  Phase I ESAs can be very complex, depending on the type of site you are evaluating.  If you can work under the guidance of a top notch Phase I Project Manager, you will gain a great skill set and a well-rounded view of the overall industry.   Joining a Subsurface Investigation department as an entry level person can also be helpful in terms of understanding typical contaminants and how they behave in the subsurface of a property.
Holly Neber
President and a principal at AEI Consultants
 
Study federal and state regulations and local industrial history.
Bob Carlson
President, Green Knight Environmental
 
 
 
Question 3
What differences are there between working for a large (national or international) environmental consulting firm compared to a smaller, regional one?
 
For starters: bureaucracy. Larger companies have much bigger food chains, and rely more heavily on bureaucratic processes to get things done. Smaller companies have more of an opportunity for a more democratic or “flat” hierarchical structure–but that is not necessarily always the case.
Second, opportunities and/or requirements for travel and professional development will likely vary between the two.
Third, benefits–and that could go in either direction. Environmental companies tend to be a bit more socially-minded and often offer great “quality-of-life” benefits, but that is really dependent on company culture.
A. Lauren Abele
COO, Pipeline Fellowship
 
Smaller firms typically allow their staff to “wear more hats” which allows for more variation in your job responsibilities.  If you join a growing smaller firm, there is often more opportunity to advance to levels of more responsibility quickly.  A larger firm may offer more opportunity to work on extremely large or complex remediation jobs or the ability to work internationally. 
Holly Neber
President and a principal at AEI Consultants
 
Larger international or national environmental consulting firms, or the environmental divisions of a large construction or international development firm may work on larger projects in more locations. Smaller firms tend to work locally or partner as subcontractors to larger firms for a piece of a large contract, foreign or domestic. The contract manager usually comes from the larger firm. I am an international consultant who has been a project manager as well as a subcontractor to large multinational corporations.
Carla Sydney Stone
Founder & Principal, International Development & Technical Assistance, LLC
 
Large tends to be more for big or quick spill cleanups under EPA oversight; small tends to be more geared towards local conditions such as endangered species, watershed issues, etc.
Bob Carlson
President, Green Knight Environmental
 
 
Question 4
If you had one piece of advice for a student looking to get into a career in environmental consulting, what would it be?
 
Develop your professional skill-set as quickly as possible. Get networking. Everyone hates it, but there is no substitute for it.
A. Lauren Abele
COO, Pipeline Fellowship
 
Do your research. Self evaluate your skills and match those with an aspect of environmental consulting that is consistent with those skills. 
Kristin Dawkins
Staff Consultant, PM Environmental
 
When you get your first job, be a hard worker.  Show your company’s management that you are up to any challenge.   Opportunities will open up to you from there.   Internships are also great.  We’ve hired a few people that originally worked for us as interns.   
Holly Neber
President and a principal at AEI Consultants
Technical advice-Water – access to clean water and the reuse of process water and wastewater- is the single most important issue affecting the world today. Life does not exist without water.

Personal advice- Learn to write well and to be comfortable speaking with people of different backgrounds.

Carla Sydney Stone
Founder & Principal, International Development & Technical Assistance, LLC
 
Get a job with a government agency first for the experience. Stay there if you can.
Bob Carlson
President, Green Knight Environmental
 
 
Question 5    
Based on your experience, what are the most surprising or unexpected elements about working in environmental consulting?
 
In general, it’s less about what I learned in school, and more about how well you do the job. But, I always love how often I get to use economic principles in my job and use project design skills from school when analyzing impact.
A. Lauren Abele
COO, Pipeline Fellowship
 
The most surprising aspect of environmental due diligence is the standardization of the process. Although every state has their own regulations, I have had experience completing Phase I ESA reports throughout the eastern and southeastern United States because of the standardized process. 
 
The most unexpected element is the number of industries you will encounter and the manufacturing processes you will have an opportunity to observe.  
Kristin Dawkins
Staff Consultant, PM Environmental
 
Every state has a unique regulatory environment so working in Michigan can be quite different from working in Illinois, even on the same type of project. 
Holly Neber
President and a principal at AEI Consultants
 
The most surprising aspect of environmental consulting is the extent to which projects are subject to politics, both in the US and abroad.
Carla Sydney Stone
Founder & Principal, International Development & Technical Assistance, LLC
 
Congress yanking funds from programs.
Bob Carlson
President, Green Knight Environmental
 
Not wanting to study to pass the LEED AP exam and then go on to work on projects.
Chuck Lohre
Green Cincinnati Education Advocacy
 
 
Question 6   
What do you find to be the most rewarding aspect of your career?
 
Essentially being my own boss and being really creative and strategic about solving social and environmental problems.
A. Lauren Abele
COO, Pipeline Fellowship
 
The most rewarding aspect of my career is the ability to be a resource for our clients.  We have clients that are just as knowledgeable as we are, and we have clients that have never even heard of environmental due diligence. I am able to provide valuable information to clients on both ends of the spectrum, and in between. 
Kristin Dawkins
Staff Consultant, PM Environmental
 
I love working with our clients to find solutions to environmental issues, and I love building a collaborative team with my co-workers. 
Holly Neber
President and a principal at AEI Consultants
 
The most rewarding aspect of my career is the opportunity to make a difference in the lives of people around the world.
Carla Sydney Stone
Founder & Principal, International Development & Technical Assistance, LLC
 
Doing public education. It’s amazing how concerned but uninformed people still are about all this stuff.
Bob Carlson
President, Green Knight Environmental
 
It’s the future.
Chuck Lohre
Green Cincinnati Education Advocacy
 
 
Biographies
A. Lauren Abele
COO, Pipeline Fellowship
 
Prior to her involvement with Pipeline Fellowship, Lauren worked in the nonprofit sector in economic development, environmental issues, and women’s empowerment. A long-time sustainability advocate, Lauren has analyzed the Kyoto Protocol with the U.S. Department of State in Brussels and worked on environmental projects in both Spain and Australia. Her interest in social and environmental issues led to her involvement in social entrepreneurship where her focus has been on strategic planning, social impact assessment, and executing mission-based business strategies.
 
She currently serves on the New York Women Social Entrepreneurs (NYWSE) Events Committee and is a former Young Nonprofit Professionals Network of New York City (YNPN-NYC) board member.
Lauren has a B.A. in English Literature and Environmental Studies from Washington University in St. Louis and an M.P.A. in Economic Development and Comparative & International Affairs from Indiana University’s School for Public and Environmental Affairs (SPEA). She is also a proud School for International Training (SIT) alumna. You can find Lauren on Twitter (@laurenabele).
 
 
Holly Neber
President, AEI Consultants
 
 Holly Neber is President and a principal at AEI Consultants, a national environmental and engineering firm headquartered in the San Francisco Bay Area.  AEI performs environmental and engineering due diligence, investigation and remediation projects with 14 offices located across the US.  Holly’s educational background consists of a Bachelor’s degree in Environmental Studies from the University of Kansas and a Masters of Education from Holy Names College.   She is a Registered Environmental Assessor (REA) in California, and oversees the day to day operations of AEI.  AEI’s website is www.aeiconsultants.com
 
Carla Sydney Stone
Founder & Principal, International Development & Technical Assistance, LLC
 
Ms. Carla Sydney Stone is the founder and principal of International Development & Technical Assistance, LLC, a firm that delivers projects that improve people’s lives. It provides consulting services to companies, non-governmental organizations, and government agencies. Ms. Stone has a proven ability to initiate and build international partnerships to achieve results. A mining engineer, with additional training and certificates in water and wastewater operations, she also acts as a consultant to governments on the critical areas of environment, human capability, and resource management. She has considerable experience in developing, managing and implementing training programs, project management and public information programs for stakeholder support.
Carla Stone is a graduate of Columbia University’s (New York) Henry Krumb School of Mines with a B.S. degree in Mining Engineering, Geophysics Option and M. S. degree in Mining Engineering and Mineral Economics. She also holds certificates in Wastewater III (Delaware) and Water Operations (Delaware). She is a Member of the Board of Directors of People to People International, Delaware Chapter, a Past Member of the Board of the World Trade Center Institute Delaware, and serves on the International Council of Delaware. She also is a member of the Water Environment Federation, the Society of Mining Engineers, Society of Women Engineers, and the Project Management Institute. She has been Chair of the Council of Economics of the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical and Petroleum Engineers. She also served as Economics Committee Chair for the Delaware Delegation to the White House Conference on Small Business.
 
Kristin Dawkins
Staff Consultant, PM Environmental
 
 
Bob Carlson
President, Green Knight Environmental
http://rlcarlson.wordpress.com/
 
Chuck Lohre, LEED AP+
Green Cincinnati Education Advocacy

Cell 513-260-9025, [email protected]http://www.green-cincinnati.com
126A West 14th Street, 2nd Floor, Cincinnati, OH 45202-7535
877-608-1736, 513-961-1174, Fax 513-961-1192
In 2007 we started to promote LEED by holding afternoon seminars as forums for prominent LEED pioneers to address the community of architects, engineers, contractors and the public. From there we started to volunteer with the Cincinnati Regional Chapter of the U.S. Green Building Council and helped develop their web site and trade show exhibit materials. Promotion doesn’t come without education and we registered our offices as a LEED CI project as well as Chuck Lohre passing the LEED AP exam. After developing educational materials for the Fernald Preserve Visitors Center we created classes to help individuals pass the LEED AP exam with one-on-one mentoring and tutoring. With the push to achieve LEED AP status by June 30, 2009, several classes were held. A unique aspect of the classes was actual tours of many regional LEED projects. We received LEED Platinum May, 5, 2011 on our office.
Read More

Trade Show Display, Exhibit Materials Sale

Effective today, Monday, August 3rd, Orbus Exhibit & Display Group is proud to announce price reductions on many of its popular product lines, including: Most Retractable Banner Stand hardware All Banner Stand graphics (all materials) Aero Banner System hardware &…

Read More

12. How Do You Tell Mind Blowing Industrial Marketing Stories?

How to Attract More Clicks to Your Blog Posts: 11 Revealing Title Tests

by Sarah Goliger

April 8, 2014 at 8:00 AM

(Thanks Sarah, for making our industrial marketing day, We’re not sure about the statistical significance (We thought it was 3%.), but you have spelled out exactly the value of A/B testing. Thanks. Here’s a link to the original post.)

Read More

Is Marketing Automation a Good Industrial Marketing Idea?

Your Top 10 Workflows Questions Answered

by Stephanie Lussier

Date

March 21, 2014 at 9:00 AM, website

(Thanks to Stephanie for this article on marketing automation. Most industrial marketing professionals don’t use marketing automation. It’s considered an insult to treat engineers with these techniques except for mundane confirmation and reminder emails. Still, this is the future of marketing to the masses of casually related individuals interested in industrial products. There always have been a huge number, just look at your website logs. You have to treat the 80 percent of the public that stumbles across your site with dignity. There’s no reason not to and many reasons it can help. Take, for example, the engineer that just spoiled several rail car loads of raisins with chocolate. He’s looking for a centrifuge to take the chocolate off of the raisins and ends up renting a unit from you. You never know and marketing automation is a good way to nurture the masses that want to be communicated to in that way. Chuck Lohre)

marketing-automationAs an inbound marketer, you are working hard to generate as many leads as possible. After a certain point, you begin to generate so many leads you can’t possibly spend all day reaching out to each and every one of them. Workflows can be your answer to following up with, nurturing and qualifying those leads. Workflows are available within professional and enterprise HubSpot accounts.

The thing is, Workflows, and marketing automation in general, can be very confusing. There are so many moving parts to manage, so many outcomes to consider, so much potential for unintended overlap. It can make even the most seasoned marketers feel hopelessly overwhelmed.

To help you navigate the world of marketing automation, we’ve put together answers to the most common questions our customers ask about Workflows. We hope these answers provide the confidence you need to jump into Workflows head first!

1. Why Aren’t My Contacts Being Enrolled in a Workflow?

When you create a Workflow with a smart list as the starting condition, before turning your Workflow live, you have the option of enrolling the lists existing contacts (see below). If, for some reason, you are noticing your contacts are not being enrolled, you should first check to make sure your Workflow is active and you have the correct form or smart list as the starting condition.

If you have heard from specific contacts that they never received a specific email from you, you can look in the history of the Workflow in question and search for an individual contact. If, for some reason, a step did not execute, you will be able to see why. Most commonly, contacts are not receiving emails in a Workflow because they are already on the goal list or suppression list or their email has previously bounced and they are not eligible to get the email.

In the example below, we see that Chris could not be re-enrolled because the settings specify that contacts should only be enrolled the first time they meet the starting criteria. We also see that Stan has unsubscribed. He will not receive any of the emails from this Workflow.Contact Not in Workflow

2. How Can I Send a Follow-up Email Based on Information Someone Provides on a Form Submission?

Sending follow-up emails based on the information provided via a form is an excellent way to give your contacts a custom experience as they go through the buyer’s journey with your business. To do this follow these steps:

  1. Start by creating a smart list for each answer you would like to provide a custom response to. Double-check you have not missed anyone by forgetting a response someone could provide.

  2. Next, you will need to write an email that corresponds to each of these smart lists. Alternatively, you could write one email and use smart content to create different versions for each answer. To do this, add a new rule for each smart list you have created and enter the custom message.

  3. Lastly, build the Workflow. You have two options here based on what you chose to do in step two.

  • If you decided to write a unique email for each response (aka. each smart list), you will need to build a separate Workflow for each smart list. The starting condition will be the smart list and the first step will be the respective email.

  • If you chose to use smart content, you can create a single Workflow where the starting condition is either a smart list or a form submission and the first step is the automated email you created with smart content.

3. How Can I Send an Email Response from a Form?

You have three options for sending an email response from a form.

1) When creating your landing page, you have the opportunity to send a follow-up email at the time of the form submission. The email will be sent immediately and simultaneously to the contact being redirected to the thank you page.

follow-up email


2) You can use a form submission as the starting condition for your Workflow. When someone fills out the form, they will be enrolled in the Workflow and receive the subsequent emails.
form submission workflow


3) You can include a form as one piece of the criteria of a smart list. This smart list can be used as the starting condition for a Workflow so when someone new is added to the list (i.e. they have filled out the form and met any other conditions you have set for the smart list) they will be enrolled in the Workflow.

form in smart list


4. What Happens to Enrolled Contacts When I Change the Timing of My Workflow Steps?

If you change the timing of your Workflow steps once there are contacts enrolled, the following will happen, based on the type of change you have made:

  • If you move the steps to happen later or further apart, e.g. Step 2 was originally scheduled to execute 7 days after Step 1 and you move it so that it is scheduled for 10 days after Step 1, all contacts who have not yet reached Step 2 will get that step at the new time you move it to.

  • If you move the steps to happen sooner or closer together, e.g. Step 2 was originally scheduled to execute 7 days after Step 1 and you move it so that it is scheduled for 5 days after Step 1, all contacts who are already scheduled* for Step 2 on that 7th day will still receive it at original time. All new contacts who have not yet been scheduled will receive it at the new time, 5 days after Step 1.

*When looking at a Workflow, you can take a look at the “History” for each contact who has ever entered the Workflow. Here you can see that when one step executes, the next is scheduled. workflow history


5. How Do Suppression Lists Work in Workflows?

A Workflow suppression list is a list of contacts you do not want to be included in your Workflow. Whenever a new contact is enrolled in your Workflow, before any steps execute (including those with a 0 delay) the suppression list is checked to verify they should be enrolled in the Workflow.

You can add suppression lists to any Workflow under Workflows settings.


workflow suppression list

6. How Do I Remove Contacts From a Workflow?

Contacts are automatically removed from a Workflow when they are added to a goal list or a suppression list. You can also choose to automatically remove contacts when they no longer are a part of the original list (starting condition) or when they are added to another Workflow.suppressions and priorities

Alternatively, individual contacts can be removed manually from a Workflow by going to their contact record and choosing from which Workflow you would like to remove them. The Workflow area can be accessed by clicking “Workflows” on the left side of the contact record.


removing a contact from a workflow

7. Can Someone Go Through a Workflow Multiple Times?

In the settings area of each Workflow you have the option of allowing someone to be enrolled each time they meet the starting criteria of a list. Without this option selected, a contact that meets the starting criteria a second time will not be enrolled.


Workflow settings

8. How Can I Schedule a Workflow Email to Send at a Specific Time and Date?

For both standard and property-based Workflows, you are unable to specify the exact date and time you want the email to send. In a standard Workflow, the steps will execute based on when someone is enrolled in the Workflow. For a property-based Workflow, each step will execute based on the timing you select around a contacts individual date. You are unable to specify the exact date and time you want the email to send. You can, however, specify a time range within which you want the steps to execute. The timing will be based on the time zone set in your HubSpot settings.Workflow settings time range

In a fixed date Workflow, you are able to pick the exact date and time you want contacts to receive the email. This timing will be based around the fixed date you include in the Workflow.


9. Can I Use Smart Content in a Workflow?

Yes! Using Smart Content in Workflows offers a great way to take your segmentation and nurturing efforts to the next level. This combination empowers you to appeal to multiple segments without building a Workflow for each. You can create one Workflow that appeals to a broad audience and then use a few more granular smart lists to dictate what content shows to each segment.

By using Smart Content in a Workflow email, a single email can display slightly different content depending on who is opening it. For example, if you wanted to show a photo of a flower to your gardener leads and a photo of a house to your construction worker leads within the same email send, a smart content module would dynamically choose what photo to display depending on whether it was a gardener or a construction worker who was receiving the email.

This can be especially useful further along in the buyer’s journey when you may be adding multiple segments of your contacts to a single decision-stage Workflow.

10. Is It Better to Use Smart Content or Personalization in a Workflow?

Try both. While Smart Content and personalization tokens both give you the ability to customize the email messages sent to your contacts, they each have different use cases for implementation.

Smart Content allows you to change the entire body of a message based on membership of a smart list or lifecycle stage. This means based on a contact’s past behavior or a series of details they have shared, you can change the entire tone and content of a message you send them. The messaging you send will be the same for the entire list of people.

Personalization tokens within an email body will help you customize the message to reflect information you have gathered about a contact, e.g. their first name, company name, business size, job title, etc. Personalization tokens can also be used within a smart content message to make the content more personable and human and make it sound less automated. When using personalization, it is important to make sure the message you write will make sense with anything that could populate the space where the token appears – a default word, like “your company” or their actual response, like “HubSpot”.

 

We hope these answers help clarify some of your questions around Workflows. Still curious to learn more about Workflows? Tell us in the comments, join a Workflows live lab or sign-up for the Intermediate Workflows Optimization session.

Try out Workflows now

{{cta(‘de7e8056-f6f3-41d6-9d82-ca57f3833f02’)}}

Read More
Back To Top
Lohre Cincinnati Industrial NewsletterTips, Pointers, and News for Cincinnati-Area Industrial Leaders

Subscribe to our newsletter for news related to Industrial Machinery and Manufacturing for the Greater Cincinnati area. Offerings include marketing and advertising tips and pointers and well news about industrial companies in our area.