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Would you pay $200,000 for this tiny house?, Green Building Marketing

By 

The developer of Cincinnati’s first tiny houses is getting ready to start construction on the homes in Over-the-Rhine.

Brad Cooper, who launched Start Small Homes after he received a $100,000 grant from People’s Liberty, expects construction to begin soon on the two small homes. Cooper’s project explores tiny homes as a solution to affordable housing, working to create a market-rate solution for diversely affordable home ownership opportunities.

One of the homes will be sold at market rate, with a list price of $200,000. Going by the usable square footage, that’s about $690 per square foot.

But Cooper said it’s not fair to compare the tiny house’s price on the traditional per-square-foot measurement since it requires all of the infrastructure of a full-sized house.

The other home will be sold to a low-income household rate. Cooper said he is still working out the details on pricing for that home.

Cooper, who is a trained architect, originally wanted to price the homes at $70,000 each. The homes also were originally designed to be smaller with a total of 200 square feet of living space. But he still says at $200,000, a buyer would be getting the tiny home at a good value.

During events held throughout the summer, about 75 people have showed up to learn more about the tiny houses.

Each two-story tiny home has a kitchen and living space on the first floor complete with a refrigerator, butcher block counter and cabinets, and the second floor has a bathroom and the bedroom.

People’s Liberty, a philanthropic lab that invests directly in individuals, has helped Cooper through the process. Jake Hodesh, vice president of operations at People’s Liberty, said they have been working to understand all the processes that go along with building a tiny house.

“We’ve learned alongside Brad what it means to build a tiny home,” Hodesh said. “We’re investing in projects that haven’t been done before.”

The homes, located at 142 and 144 Peete St., will have solar panels and are designed to take advantage of passive cooling. Cooper expects utilities to cost about $50 per month.

Cooper doesn’t have additional sites for more tiny homes at this point, but he has learned ways to bring the prices down. By building more tiny houses at one time, as well as getting smaller lots or building multiple tiny homes on the same lot, he believes he would be able to bring prices down.

Demeropolis covers commercial real estate and development.

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Best Practices in Process Equipment Marketing – Short Courses for the Bulk Materials Handling Industry

(We love educational material. It’s getting rarer and rarer for universities to offer classes on industrial processes. They are usually left to teach theory and let the greenhorn learn on the job. We’re writing a size reduction systems article for ROCK PRODUCTS. If you have any resources we can use, please send them on.)

From the Bulk Inside newsletter Dec 7, 2015

Short-Courses-for-the-Bulk-Materials-Handling-Industry-300-1.jpgCHATHAM, KENT – A range of very popular and useful short courses designed specifically for the powder and
 bulk materials handling industry.

Our range of short courses is designed to equip delegates with the means to identify and overcome difficulties that may arise, saving time and increasing productivity.

Our experts’ in-depth knowledge as specialists in powders and bulk solids is complemented by their experience across all industries including, but not limited to, renewable energy, pharmaceuticals, process and chemical engineering, recycling, food processing and mining.

In order to meet Industry’s changing needs, we continually update the range of courses to reflect current trends, hence the introduction of 3 new courses this year.

The courses are all held at our site in Kent, on the University of Greenwich campus.

2016 Course calendar
2 – 3 Feb:    Advanced Course: Pneumatic Conveying System Design
4 Feb:    Rotary Valves; Design Selection and Operational Issues
10 Feb:    Electrostatics in Powder Handling
24 Feb:    Powder and Dust Containment in the Process Industry
9 March:    Network Security of Industrial Control Systems in the Process Industry  – ** new course
15 – 17 March:    Storage and Discharge of Powders and Bulk Materials; includes optional practical session
6 April:    Dust Explosions – How to Demonstrate DSEAR/ATEX Compliance
13 April:    Caking and Lump Formation in Powders and Bulk Solids
26 – 27 April:    Advanced Course: Design of Equipment for Storing and Discharging Bulk Materials
10 – 12 May:    Pneumatic Conveying of Bulk Materials; includes optional practical session
24 May:    Undesired De-blending and Separation in Processes and Equipment
7 – 8 June:    Introduction to the Processing of Dry Solid Materials  – **new course
28 – 29 June:    Measurement of the Properties and Bulk Behaviour of Particulate Materials
5 July:    Handling and Storage of Waste and Recycled Bulk Materials – **new course
11 – 13 Oct:    Overview of Particulate Handling Technology; includes optional practical session
22 – 24 Nov:    Pneumatic Conveying of Bulk Materials; includes optional practical session
13 – 14 Dec:   Biomass Handling, Feeding and Storage

For full course details, course fees and terms and conditions, please visit www.bulksolids.com Discounts are available for group bookings and repeat attendances.

Enquiries and Bookings

• + 44 20 8331 8646

© The Wolfson Centre for Bulk Solids Handling Technology

This article is published by The Wolfson Centre for Bulk Solids Handling Technology
“Providing Cost-Effective Solutions to Industrial Problems”

The Wolfson Centre for Bulk Solids Handling Technology is part of the School of Engineering at The University of Greenwich at Medway, Kent, UK and has specialised in solving materials handling problems since 1973.  

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How can I convince my boss to send me to training? Process Equipment Marketing Best Practice

Thanks to Balluff, Sensortech 

Posted on by 

trainingWith responsibilities expanding, resources declining, and margins narrowing, companies today must scrutinize every dollar spent. Bad decisions are often based on bad data. An informed decision, on the other hand, can be defended in the light of the facts. In this article, we examine three misconceptions –  misconceptions which too often lead to poor decisions about training.

  1. If I train my people, they will leave.

In today’s companies where people change positions frequently, training is seen as a risky investment.  The correct perspective is seeing the risk involved in NOT training your people.  Do you really want your people making costly mistakes by the trial-and-error method of on-the-job training? Lack of training does not just affect the untrained person. Those that have been trained and are doing the job correctly often get pulled aside to explain procedures to the untrained. The bottom line is that people are going to be trained one way or another. What is the most efficient way to do this?

  1. I can’t afford the downtime to send my people to training.

Tools need to be sharpened.  This means they can’t be “productive” 100% of the time.  “Productivity” needs to be seen as a totally different thing from being “busy.”   Once a tool is sharpened, it is far more productive.  A dull tool can be “busy” 100 % of the time accomplishing nothing of value.  The correct perspective then is that you can’t afford the loss of productivity caused by a lack of training.

  1. All training offered out there is basically the same, so just take the cheapest one.

Training is not a one-way dump of information.  Training means that a change has taken place in a cognitive domain, an affective domain, or a psychomotor domain.  For automation companies, these three domains are intricately linked.  For example, it is not enough to just sit through a safety presentation:  you need to know the safety regulations (cognitive), you need to be passionate about why these are important (affective), and you need the skill necessary to implement these regulations by specifying, configuring, and integrating systems (psychomotor).

The best way to train in the psychomotor domain is through hands-on training.  Students learn skills best by practicing those skills.  For many companies who offer training, training is just a presentation of ideas without the necessary opportunity for participants to try anything for themselves. At Balluff, we have made a substantial investment in equipment, an investment in writing courseware properly, and an investment in training those who conduct the training with platform skills, adult learning skills, and teaching skills.  These investments make world-class, performance-based training available to our customers.

To see all that Balluff has to offer in Automation Training, click on our training web page link:  http://www.balluff.com/balluff/MUS/en/service/standard-training.jsp

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FORECAST FOR 2016 – Construction Equipment Marketing

AFTER SEVERAL YEARS OF GRADUAL PROGRESS, THE ECONOMIC STARS ARE ALIGNING IN FAVOR OF A MORE ROBUST COMMERCIAL ENVIRONMENT.

(The economy is booming, be sure you focus on the markets that are growing. Take Donald Trump’s advice, “Don’t get into an industry in decline.” Or don’t make the mistake we did, getting into Green Building Marketing right at the downturn. No problem, now we’re prepared. Chuck Lohre)

By Phillip Perry, The Electrical Distributor Magazine (TED) Dec 2016

“WE EXPECT 2016 WILL BE A GOOD YEAR, WITH INCREASED consumer spending driving economic growth,” said Sophia Koropeckyj, managing director of industry economics at the research firm Moody’s Analytics. Why the sunny outlook? Economists point to a number of conditions favoring businesses: Higher employment, lower consumer debt, greater credit availability, and trimmed gasoline prices all lead to a more robust American economy. All should do their part to help en – courage stronger growth over the coming 12 months.

Business_to_Consumer_Marketing.pngRETAIL

Performance in the retail sector is a critical driver for the American economy in general—and one in which economists see an improving picture in 2016. “We expect core retail sales to grow 5.5% in 2016,” said Scott Hoyt, senior director of consumer economics for Moody’s Analytics. That growth rate is notably faster than the 4.2% rate anticipated when 2015 sales are finally tallied. The 2015 experience was slightly better than the 3.9% growth of 2014. If Moody’s Analytics is accurate in its forecast, businesses can rejoice, as the anticipated rate is not that far off the roughly 6% increases retailers commonly enjoyed during the robust decade of the 1990s—as well as the period they fondly remember just prior to the Great Recession. What will drive the anticipated retail sales increase? Primarily higher wages, fueled by the growing number of people gainfully employed.

 

Construction_Equipment_Marketing.pngHOUSING

Businesses depend on a healthy economy to support strong sales. And one of the most important drivers of that is a robust housing construction sector that employs more people and generates more disposable income. “The ever-tightening market for new homes will likely spur stronger construction activity in 2016,” said Sophia Koropeckyj, managing director of industry economics at Moody’s Analytics. Indeed, housing starts are expected to rise 29.5% for the year, a considerable improvement over the 14.5% figure expected for 2015 when final numbers are tallied. (The rate for 2014 was 5.8%.) Why the spike in construction? According to Koropeckyj, the nation’s inventory of new homes has been falling steadily to the point where builders are now expected to perceive solid economic benefits in gearing up into higher production. The decline in inventory over the past year came about as builders held back from constructing new homes, concerned that consumer demand had not met expectations. That demand, in turn, was soft because, said Koropeckyj, “many young families saddled with mountains of student debt were opting to continue renting.” Granted, some conditions will have to be met before the housing rebound occurs. “The tightening housing market by itself does not guarantee a resumption of singlefamily construction,” noted Koropeckyj. “Household debt burdens will still have to fall significantly before buyers of new homes start to return to the market in strength. Even so, the U.S. recovery, with some outside help from low gasoline prices and consequently low inflation, is pulling that date forward.” The expected housing rebound should have a related effect: Home prices are expected to increase by only 2.9% in 2016, a deceleration of the 6.3% expected for 2015.

Metalworking_Equipment_marketing.pngMANUFACTURING

Of special importance to all businesses is the performance by one subset of the larger corporate world: manufacturers. Any growth in that sector has a dramatic effect on employment—and therefore on the economy in general—because manufacturing is heavily dependent on a skilled labor force. It seems that manufacturers are looking ahead to a 2016 that will match or exceed what has been a reasonably good 2015. “Conditions are positive but not robust or booming,” said Tom Palisin, executive director of the Manufacturers’ Association (mascpa.org). “Manufacturers are doing slightly better than they were a year ago. They are reporting low to moderate growth, solid orders, and a good backlog.” Low energy prices are favorable for the sector. Looking to 2016, Palisin said, “Members are cautiously optimistic.” A telling indicator of that optimism is a new initiative to bolster the workforce. “One significant change is a move by many companies to invest more in their training budgets,” said Palisin, adding that manufacturers are doing so in response to a number of conditions: an improving economy, several years of cost cutting that has led to a lean workforce, and a lack of available skilled talent combined with low unemployment. “Employers now seem more eager to retain the employees they have by investing in training of their existing workforce,” Palisin added. That will translate into higher salaries and still more disposable income in consumers’ wallets. Manufacturers will be helped by a growing availability of credit, which has loosened considerably since the tight years of the Great Recession. “Rates are low and banks are willing to invest,” said Palisin. “However, there has not been much demand for commercial loans because many companies have sufficient cash on hand to finance their growth needs.” Others, he said, have delayed capital investment due to economic uncertainty and a tough regulatory environment.

LABOR

The most important contributing factor to a more robust marketplace, said Koropeckyj, is the growing health of the labor force. “Wage gains are now materializing across a number of industries and regions,” she said, noting that consumers will have more disposable cash to spend. Moody’s reported that unemployment fell to 5.1% in late 2015, a full percentage point decline over the level 12 months previous and a rate nearly identical to the 5% economists believe represents a condition of “full employment.” “While there is still slack in the labor market, it is declining quickly,” said Scott Hoyt, senior director of consumer economics for Moody’s Analytics. “At some point in 2016 the labor market should become tight, which should translate into faster growth in wages and consumer spending.” Indeed, Moody’s expects the nation to reach full employment by mid-2016 and the average unemployment rate during the fourth quarter of that year to be 4.8%. Gains in employment nationwide have helped create a population more confident of the future – and therefore more prone to spend. “Consumers have been feeling reasonably well,” said Walter Simson, principal of Ventor Consulting. Economists expect consumer confidence to continue to rise over the coming 12 months in response to a brighter employment picture.

A STRONGER ECONOMY

So just how good is “good” for 2016? That depends on how much consumers and businesses spend nationwide on goods and services. The faster the rise in that figure—the GDP—the healthier the economy. For 2016, Moody’s expects GDP to grow 3.25%. That’s considerably higher than the expected 2015 rate of 2.5%. The 2015 results, to be confirmed when the year’s sales numbers are tallied, were just slightly higher than 2014’s 2.43% growth rate. One big driver of the rise in GDP is expected to be an improving performance by large employers. Businesses of all sizes benefit when major corporations rack up healthy profits. Good earnings stimulate business expansion and an attendant investment in buildings and equipment. That generates still more business for suppliers, along with more employment and disposable income for consumers. In this area, again, the future looks rosy. “Corporate profit growth is expected to accelerate some 9.2% through 2016,” said Koropeckyj. That’s a considerable improvement over the results for 2015, when profits actually declined slightly as a result of the strong dollar (which weakened exports) and a decrease in energy revenues following a drop in commodity prices. Why the rebound? Moody’s is looking to a recovery in global economies, along with a diminished drag from the dollar, to help turn things around. Several factors, though, could cause a delay. “Our narrative rests on the assumption that wages and productivity will rise in lockstep,” said Koropeckyj. “But this may not hold. Productivity growth has been weak, allowing even modest wage gains to push unit labor costs higher.” Wage growth is likely to grow faster than productivity, she added, noting, “This would further compress margins and lower the outlook for corporate profits.”

DARK CLOUDS

Challenges remain. Businesses should keep an eye out for further developments in lingering issues such as the softening of European and Chinese economies, a volatile American stock market, and political gridlock in Washington. “Businesses prefer stability and consistency,” said Tom Palisin, executive director of the Manufacturers’ Association (mascpa.org). “Right now, we have anything but that.” Even so, signs point to continuing marketplace strength. “We think the economy should weather the current uncertainties,” said Hoyt. “A lot of our optimism centers on the strength in the labor markets.” A healthy jobs picture, then, should make all the difference in 2016. “Early in the year businesses should watch what is happening with wages,” said Hoyt. “If the labor market tightens as expected, that will lead to higher wages and more consumer spending.” 􀀀

Perry is a business journalist based in New York City and a three-time winner of the “Value to the Reader” award from the American Bar Association. Reach him at [email protected].

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5 Ways To Take The Pain Out Of Process Equipment Marketing

Process Equipment Marketing is more like high level consulting rather than selling a simple industrial product like a fork lift or truck. The cost is usually higher and an ongoing partnership between the customer and the manufacturer needs to be part of the relationship.

Process Equipment MarketingOne of the challenges I often hear from companies is this: “We know what new business activities we should be doing. We just don’t do them consistently.” Many times a company that knows it’s ideal customer doesn’t have the resources to make the cold calls needed to get through to the manufacturing engineer. This is where the internet can go to work. The internet can be your 24/7 technical sales person.

And that makes a lot of sense. New business involves lots of unglamorous and, frankly, unenjoyable activities. Stuff like: sales meetings, staying in touch with prospects, and applying just the right “nudge” to prospects who are making a buying decision.

In addition to being not a lot of fun, many new business programs are pretty disorganized: leads falling through the cracks, missed hand offs between sales team members and details from prior conversations lost or incomplete. But even if you did have it, trying to touch base exactly when needed (when the chief engineer goes back to researching esoteric keyword phrases to find a solution to a value added problem).

So if new business is unenjoyable and disorganized, is it any surprise that companies aren’t executing their plans consistently?

This post lays out a few ways that companies can build a process for new sales that’s organized and consistent. We can promise that this will make new business your favorite thing to do, it will help you execute and get better results. And that’s pretty fun.

1. Create a Plan

First things first: you need an overarching plan for new business. Before you invest in tactics, content, technology or anything else, create a plan. New business strategy and planning is a blog post all its own and there are lots of great resources out there to help you on this front, so I’m not going to dig into the details on this topic. Typically a plan is, “We need customers we can partner with, ones we can add value to the equation. We don’t want to compete on price.”

When you work with your customers, you help them build a manufacturing strategy and a plan before you start going into system plan and equipment. Your marketing plan is very similar.

In the internet world you need to do new business activities each week, several times per week. The purpose of this is to consciously choose your highest priority leads, opportunities and activities for the week and execute those. 

2. Get a Customer Relationship Management (CRM) system (and Use It)

Leads: In an average month you probably come across a handful of new potential prospects. For instance, you come across an interesting company when reading an article, or a colleague at a networking event mentions a thought leader who you should get in touch with, or you discover a promising organization while doing a Google search. You need a place to park these leads while you research or reach out to them. Your CRM process should have a central place where you can store new leads while you’re in process of qualifying them.

Contacts: Once you’ve qualified a lead as a good prospect or partner, you need an organized way to keep in touch with them. That may involve “one-to-many” communication like newsletters or nurture campaigns, or “one-to-one” communication like personalized emails or phone calls. For each contact that you’ve qualified it’s important to have them categorized (or “segmented”) based on criteria like their industry, and their quality/potential. You probably have hundreds or thousands of contacts in your database: to create a personalized outreach plan for each is impossible. So we identify a few segments and then create an outreach plan for each. This allows for efficiency and organization.

Opportunities: Opportunities are the active deals that you’re working on. An Opportunity involves a specific piece of work: a project or a concept, and generally goes through a standard set of steps (for instance: initial meeting, proposal, negotiation, and close). A CRM can give you an overview of all the potential business on the table to ensure you’re proactively moving all of them towards wins, and to find trends in process after the fact.

Clients: Do you have a plan for keeping in touch with existing and former customers, and cultivating new business opportunities? Remember, new business doesn’t just mean new customers. A good start for your wear or replacement parts business list but those influencers in the company might not be the new process systems engineer.

Activities: Your CRM should provide you a dashboard of all your current activities. All your new business TODO’s in a single place.

Before you worry about automation, advanced metrics or new technology, get the fundamentals right: a simple system for managing your leads, contacts, opportunities, clients and new business activities.

3. Translate Your Goals Into Simple Metrics

What’s your primary goal for the year?

When you create your new business plan, you’ll of course spend time defining or refining your goals. Another smart technique is to define some simple business metrics to make sure your new business activities are on track to reach those goals.

For example, let’s say your goal is to grow revenue by 5% this year and start working with new OEMs.

The next step would be to answer these questions: How many new customers would you need to increase revenue by 5%? And how many well-qualified prospects do you need to land a new customer?

Let’s say the answer to those two questions are 2 and 10, respectively. Assuming you don’t lose any existing customers, you’ll need about 20 new well-qualified leads to reach your goal. Obviously this isn’t an exact science, but it’s extremely valuable to give you a general benchmark for the number of new prospects (or leads, or opportunities, or whatever) that your new business activities need to be generating.

If your analysis says you need 20 qualified leads to hit your goal, but you’re currently only generating 1 or 2 a year, you’ll need to adjust your new business efforts to achieve your objectives.

4. There’s marketing and there’s customer relationships

There are a few truths about new business: relationships are king, timing is everything, consistency is important, deals don’t close themselves/selling is required. Another key point about new business is this: You can’t keep in touch with everyone.

Sure, you can add as many resources as you like to media, trade shows and internet marketing, but when it comes to the One-to-One high-touch, personalized communications that are critical for new business, there’s a limited number of prospects you can keep in touch with.

Every company should have their “Top-20″ (or Top-12, 15, 18, whatever) list of ideal prospects that they proactively keep in touch with on a monthly (or more frequent) basis. We want to stress the importance of breaking down your overarching priorities into weekly priorities. If your goal is to keep in touch with everyone your Top-20 list once a month, that’s about 5 personalized contacts per week (or one per day). When you build that into your weekly or daily game plan that’s how you develop consistency.

5. Let the odds work in your favor

This decade is about marketing automation.

The purpose of marketing automation is to take work off the plate of the leadership so they can do the new business work that only they can do: building relationships and closing business. It’s a big topic that deserves more space than we can provide here, but there are a few questions you could ask to start thinking about the sales enablement process that you need:

What Is the Work That only I Can Do?: What are the new business activities that only I – the owner – can do effectively? What other new business activities am I doing that marketing automation could do (e.g. assigning tasks, integrating systems, recording notes/ entering data, searching through Sent mail, sending boilerplate emails, etc.)?

What Can I Delegate?: Who else in the company (or outside of the company) could take over the non-required tasks listed above? Is there someone in the company who can be responsible for marketing automation (i.e. a single person who is responsible for making sure the systems work, the data is up to date, the activities are getting done, the process is being followed)? This doesn’t need to be someone’s full time job, and it doesn’t need to be a senior person in the company. For instance, there could a junior sales person who has an interest and aptitude for process/systems work who would be great for the role of managing the CRM and sales enablement.

What Are The Handoffs Between Me and My Team?: Once you know the roles and responsibilities, it’s important to define the process for how people will execute their tasks and communicate. How will lead/prospect/opportunity ownership be assigned among the team? How will tasks be passed between team members? What are the criteria for qualifying a lead? What happens when the lead is qualified? What are the stages of your sales process and how are opportunities moved from one stage to the next? An effective new business process doesn’t just get the company more new business, it also takes work off the company executive’s plate.

New business efforts often fall short because of lack of consistency. It’s the classic story: Company A diligently keeps in touch with a Prospect for a few months, Company A loses track of Prospect for 6 months, Company A gets back in touch with Prospect only to find that Prospect just hired Company B. That’s no fun.

The companies that are able execute their new business program consistently over time have built processes to ensure that activities are planned out, prioritized, organized, delegated and measured. The process doesn’t need to be perfect, it just needs to be clear and followed by everyone at the company. 2016 is just around the corner. Make it the year that you achieve the new business results you know you can.BrianShea-201511031-300x300.jpeg

BrianShea-201511031-300x300.jpegInspired by a post in RSW/US, Agency Client Relationship Experts, Agency New Business Insights guest post by Brian Shea, founder of Shea Consulting, Advertising agency new business development is very similar to expensive process equipment purchases. 

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Food Engineering Magazine Field Report Preparation Guide for Process Equipment Marketing

Here are some pointers for preparing a Food Engineering Field Report by Debra Schug—also known as an application story, success story or an application brief for our Dry Processing Technology section. (Application articles are the foundation of any food process equipment marketing campaign. Chuck Lohre)

Food_Engineering_Magazine_Process_Equipment_Marketing.pngA Dry Processing Technology Field Report describes a problem and its solution. It may involve any product used in the food processing industry; for example, feeders, screening equipment, size reduction equipment, mixing/blending, bulk bag filling & discharging, mechanical conveying, pneumatic conveying, dust control, weighing systems, storage systems, micro and macro ingredient handling systems, thermal processing equipment (ovens, dryers) packaging equipment, metal detection/magnetic separation, process control system hardware and software, and so on. If you’re not sure whether your product, application or service applies, please call and we’ll brainstorm it. See sample Dry Processing Technology Field Reports attached.

Absolute requirements for publication

A submittal must contain the following or it will not be used.

  • Body copy of 500 to 700 words
  • At least two end user (food processor) quotes: perhaps one describing the problem and one suggesting that he/she is pleased with the solution, which should be quantifiable. That is, for example, it saved xx amount of time, reduced energy costs by xx percent, or the process improvements increased OEE by xx percent.
  • If you are unable to get end user (food processor) quotes, we may still have interest in the application story. We use this version online and in our bi-monthly eNewsletter. Think of these stories coming from a well know cereal manufacture or leading snack producer perspective. We require the same information, without the processor quotes or references.
  • Name of user company and name and title of person being quoted at the user Company

Quotes from supplier companies will not be used, and will be turned into straight text when appropriate.

  • Photograph of product, service, software at the food processor’s site—not a straight

product shot! Photograph must be print quality; that is high resolution jpg at 300 pixels per inch (ppi). Recommended physical size is at least 5×7 inches. Do not send Web quality. Don’t forget a suggested caption and photo credit. You may send more than one photo. Do not save screen dumps as jpg files! Use a non-destructive format (tif). Call for instructions!

  • Real name of a person, phone number and email at the supplier for more information

(sales contact)—no web addresses or [email protected] addresses!

  • Your contact info: Name, phone, email, address.

Please advise as to where this story may have already been published. If it has been used on a

competing publication’s website or in a printed magazine, we won’t be able to use it. If it’s been

published on a supplier’s website, we can use it as long as it’s not more than a year old. Obviously, if exclusive rights to use the story have already been given to someone else, please don’t send it to us. Please make sure of this first. Also, be sure you have cleared the story with the processor.

Please note: These stories are used on a FIFO basis (first in, first out). Publishing dates cannot be guaranteed, but complete submissions, of course, will be published before incomplete submissions.

Contact Debra Schug for more information: Debra Schug, Features Editor, Food Engineering,

[email protected], 847-405-4068.


If you liked this you may also like to read our Media Relations guidelines.

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Editorial Opportunities for Process Equipment Marketing

By Kevin Cronin, Editor-in-Chief, Powder Build Solids, 973-786-6401, [email protected]

(This just in from Kevin, we’ve just started a PR campaign for our client Roto-Disc. You’ll see Kevin’s placement of our product release at Powder Bulk Solids Online.

 Process_Equipment_Marketing_Roto-Disc_PBS_PR.jpg

All editorial submissions are considered for inclusion on our website at www.powderbulksolids.com, as well as for our e-newsletters, and our print edition, and are free of charge. Call with any questions.

  • Equipment Reviews

– Roughly 150 words; preferably a Word document

– High-resolution jpg that is 300 dpi/ppi at 3 inches wide or larger

– Consideration for front cover/Editor’s Choice page

  • Case Studies/Application Stories

– Exclusivity: not previously published or offered elsewhere

– Roughly 1,000 to 2,000 words

– Few high-resolution images (jpg, 300 dpi/ppi, 3 inches wide) with short captions

  • Technical Articles/“How To” Articles

– Exclusivity: not previously published/offered elsewhere

– Educational/objective, non-promotional

– Up to 2500 words

– Few high-resolution images (jpg, 300 dpi/ppi, 3 inches wide) with short captions

  • Guest Column (“Industry Insight”)

– Appears on page 6 of every issue

– Topic coincides with the editorial focus of the issue (see editorial calendar)

– Educational/objective, non-promotional

– 700 words and a short bio on the author and head shot of author

  • Industry News

– Mergers, acquisitions, expansions, partnerships, promotions, new hires, new reps, etc.

– Includes a link to your/your client’s website

– Notification from me when it is live


For more information on how to write an application story go to the page in our Marketing Handbook.

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Lohre Cincinnati Industrial NewsletterTips, Pointers, and News for Cincinnati-Area Industrial Leaders

Subscribe to our newsletter for news related to Industrial Machinery and Manufacturing for the Greater Cincinnati area. Offerings include marketing and advertising tips and pointers and well news about industrial companies in our area.