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Our new location is in Blue Ash Ohio. We moved our marketing agency from Cincinnati's Over the Rhine in December of 2019. If you would like to arrange a meeting, please call us at (513) 463-3429. In order to keep our employees healthy and safe, walk-ins are not currently welcome.

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Phone: (513) 463-3429
Address: 11223 Cornell Park Drive Suite 301, Blue Ash Ohio 45242

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Lohre Industrial Marketing Location

2018 Industrial Advertising & PR Plan

Featured Image (above) from Technical article in Forging Magazine Good Technical Articles are Often More Valuable than Ads We hear a lot about content marketing and social media (and we believe in it), but in the industrial marketing and industrial…

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Gear Designs – OEM New Product Launch

The fundamental transmission of mechanical power hasn’t changed in several hundred years. “Coupled to most rotary electric motors is either a chain-sprocket drive, a belt-pulley drive, or a gear drive,” said Brian Dengel, general manager of KHK USA. “Each has its advantages and disadvantages, but none of them have become obsolete,” he added. Nevertheless, gear design has seen the recent rise of custom gearing; a trend towards manufacturing for better gearboxes and servogear sets; and industry migration towards helical gearing and other efficient choices.

4 ABM Drives Synchronous Motors and Drives 400.jpg

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Sinochron® Encoderless Motor Saves Up To 35 Percent

The SINOCHRON® Encoderless Motor design offers advantages in continuous duty applications. The efficiency is also better in partially loaded duty cycles, when compared to standard asynchronous motors. Drive units are virtually loss-free in no-load operation. This motor design offers advantages in powering conveying equipment; escalators, spooling machines, compressors and traction drive units amongst others. By substituting existing line powered three-phase drive units, energy savings of 20 to 35 percent can be expected.

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Metal Working Equipment Marketing Plan

To ThomasNet or not to ThomasNet, that is the question. Hmm, it means blogging to the rescue!

ThomasNet, or Thomas Register as it was called years ago, has become a Platinum Hubspot resaler. It’s not much of a directory any more since they couldn’t compete with Google.  They are a good blogger as a good Hubspot dealer should be. A directory program with ThomasNet runs at least several thousands of dollars to start, but like our advice for purchasing search engine ad words, “Don’t do it until you have optimized your web site first.” We’ve found that ThomasNet’s directory is only good in certain industries that have adopted it as a platform to generate quotes. But even those are going away and Thomas’ attempts to teach newbes is a losing attempt.

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Industrial Social Media for Quarries

 (Thanks to Trevor Hall, Founder, Clear Creek Digital, for this great article in the July/August 2016 STONE SAND & GRAVEL REVIEW. We thought it was just going to be another marketer that was selling industrial social media to accounts that didn’t use it industrially themselves let alone actually have experience working in a quarry, but Trevor is the real deal and has some good tips for quarries to improve their community relations.)

Social Media Can Help Improve an Operation

industrial-social-media.jpgOUR ONLINE NEWS FEEDS and social media accounts are more and more filled with websites and articles with catchy titles like “Top 5 Amazing Survivor Stories,” “10 Apps for your iPhone,” “8 Rocks That Look Like Celebrities.” We all, myself included, get caught wanting to know more about these headlines. Many times we click and visit the information.

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12 Questions Every Manufacturer Should Ask Themselves

 (Thanks to Ken Maisch for this great article in the July 15, 2016 Cincinnati Business Courier. If you don’t know the competition and the marketplace, you won’t be able to grow your business.)

Ken_Maisch.jpgRecently I attended an economic briefing session to get some insight into where the economists saw us heading over a period of time. After the meeting, while I was reviewing the data we received, I began to think about TechSolve’s client companies and how they were preparing for changes in their customer’s needs, based on changing economics, and how they were and should be planning for future changes.

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The Breakdown of Trust in Manufacturing

(Thanks to Reva Russell English of MakeTime “Buy & Sell Machine Tool Time Service Site” for some good thoughts on the state of manufacturing today. Go to their site. As part of the scavenger economy, buying and selling spare machine tool time is a great idea. At least there are no barriers to entry as AirBnB has. Every time I stay at someone’s home, they tell me to say “I’m a friend” if anyone asks. My sister-in-law stopped making $1500 a month because their insurance company wouldn’t insure their home if they continued.)

Manufacturng Marketing GraphicIf all you knew about U.S. manufacturing were gleaned from today’s pundits and presidential candidates, you’d think the entire sector was being fitted for its coffin. While it’s true challenges exist, things are not as grim as they’re made out to be.

No, American manufacturing does not directly employ 20 percent of the country’s labor force like it did during the late 1970s, but it’s output has never been higher. The planet is full of “Made in the USA” products, and if U.S. manufacturers and suppliers play their cards right, it will get fuller still. In order for that to happen in a sustainable way, however, the breakdown of trust between American manufacturers and suppliers must be addressed.

TRUST IS A PRACTICE …

Trust first began to falter between U.S. suppliers and manufacturers during the 1980s when offshoring went mainstream. While American companies had long engaged in foreign direct investment to be closer to foreign markets and materials sources, the ‘80s ushered in offshoring as a cost cutting measure. By outsourcing manufacturing to countries with cheap, unregulated and non-unionized labor, fatter bottom lines were almost immediately achieved.

Back stateside, U.S. machinists and factory line workers lost their jobs. Factories and shops closed. In some instances, whole towns were basically gutted and left for dead. The suppliers still standing funnelled their little remaining power into making the RFQ process even murkier in order to ensure they made as much money as possible when jobs did come their way. The breakdown in trust was well underway, and it would only get worse in the coming decades.

… SO PRACTICE IT WE MUST

Of course, believing U.S. corporations and suppliers should have — or could have — acted otherwise given the circumstances is to misunderstand the nature of business. The pursuit of revenue and the complementary cutting of costs are always a company’s first order of business, regardless of its mission statement or on which side of the manufacturing coin it finds itself.

Instead of expecting CEOs to choose lower profit margins by keeping costly shops and factories open across America’s heartland on principle, manufacturers and suppliers could have joined together to lobby for policies that incentivized the making of U.S. goods in the good ol’ U.S. of A. Instead of expecting shops and factories to willingly price themselves into the basement in order to get jobs they’d only lose money on, manufacturers and suppliers could have worked together to increase overall domestic competitiveness and productivity.

If that sounds like a pipedream, consider how high the costs of offshoring actually are.

Beyond the domestic job loss, as an executive from a large corporation put it in an article for the Harvard Business Review, “I don’t think people realize when they make the offshore decision that it is really a commitment to freeze the product. There is no way to make rapid design changes and product updates at a remote location.”

That’s a quote from 1988.

THE DISTRIBUTED DIFFERENCE

In today’s fractured, fast and just-in-time marketplace, offshoring as a cost cutting measure makes even less sense than it used to. Why cut costs making products in China today if the market you’re serving in the U.S. changes its mind about what it wants to buy tomorrow? From fluctuations in shipping expenses to a regional coup d’etat that disrupts your supply chain, offshoring can actually cost thousands — if not millions — of extra hours, dollars and customer complaints.

With a well-executed distributed manufacturing model that moves beyond the RFQ with visibly aligned prices and costs, both U.S. manufacturers and U.S. suppliers stand to win and win big. Thanks to America’s skilled and highly productive suppliers, manufacturers can bring products to market just-in-time, no matter how fickle the consumer gets. Thanks to that ongoing investment in real dollars and cents, the skills and productivity needed to keep bringing products to market just-in-time will keep being available, too.

At long last, it’s become clear that U.S. manufacturers’ and suppliers’ goals are in alignment. Today’s consumer wants it now, in slate gray or coral —no jade — with 20-inch rims and an already-charged battery. Without a network of suppliers able to handle that kind of quick and granular manufacturing on-demand, manufacturers will lose, and if that happens, they’ll take even more jobs with them.

It’s time to bring more manufacturing jobs home — not because of sentiment, but because it makes good business sense for everyone involved. What’s good for the goose is localized and distributed manufacturing. It also happens to be good for the gander. Finally, everyone is starting to realize it.

MakeTime is a distributed manufacturing platform for U.S. manufacturers and suppliers. To find out how MakeTime can benefit your manufacturing company, contact us today.


Here’s an excerpt from another blog post about one of our clients that have also successfully navigated the tough times in manufacturing.Manufacturing Marketing Article

Heinz Loosli, CEO of Feintool International Holding discusses the strategic advantage of Feintool in this interview for its customer magazine. In response to a question about the company’s recovery from the automotive industry decline in 2009, he answers, “We brought new, innovative products to market, we have played more to our strengths and in doing so achieved some great successes in the market. We have also improved our ability to complete by implementing measures to increase efficiency. It is important to appreciate that it is not a case of one-off actions but ongoing commitment that will ensure our company has a successful future. The motto is: achieve more with less. We are constantly working on this…” This statement reflects both the company’s equipment’s strategic advantages but also good business practices. Feintool’s metal part-making equipment takes plate steel and produces parts that are assembly ready without post machining. Their machines achieve more with less material and processing — Loosli is using the same analogy for the company’s management practises. You can download the entire Feintool magazine here. For the North American edition, Lohre & Associates wrote two articles, edited and printed the publication here in Cincinnati. We are honored to work with Feintool’s Cincinnati offices and we feel the company’s marketing communications are equal to Deloitte’s.” Read the entire post.

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6 Mistakes Exhibitors Make at Trade Shows

Are you getting the most out of your trade show presence?

Jim Beckwith on Marketing, looking serious.By Jim Beckwith,
Metalcasting Design & Purchasing

Many metalcasters utilize trade show exhibits as part of their marketing plan. Trade shows are a proven source of tangible ROI in the form of leads, and they continue to grow in popularity. But exhibitors often fail to realize the full potential of trade shows.

Below are some of the key mistakes made by exhibitors at trade shows. See if you recognize any.

Substandard Visual Presence. There’s nothing like the feeling that every other exhibitor simply looks better than you. This isn’t usually an issue at Cast in North America, where there are always one or two booths staffed by one person with only a briefcase full of castings and pamphlets. Don’t be that guy.

No Show-Specific Sales Strategy. Many of us have been to shows where a return visit to the same booth gets us completely different information. This confuses and irritates prospects. Coordinate with booth staff before and during the show to ensure everyone is staying on message.

Too much “Hard Sell”. If your company is indexed thoroughly in all show programs and related materials, potential customers will seek you out. You’re unlikely to pick up business from the kind of customers you want by getting out in the aisle and invading their personal space. Encourage booth staff to be approachable without being overly aggressive.

Wrong ROI Metrics. Leads are the most visible and important measure of ROI for your exhibit at the show, but don’t forget about the intangibles. You’re improving your visibility and branding, as well as providing your sales staff with valuable “face time” so they can fine tune their approach.

Exhibiting in a Vacuum. Shows are an important component of a marketing plan, but they can’t be the only thing you do. Your comprehensive year-round marketing plan feeds into your successful trade show exhibit, and vice versa.

(Non-Exhibitors) Ignoring the Show. If you’ve made the decision not to exhibit this year, don’t simply ignore this year’s show floor. The best way to learn do’s and don’ts for show exhibits is to see what your competitors are doing.

For more tips on how to get the most out of your trade show exhibit, take a look at this excellent article from Entrepreneur Magazine. As a veteran of many relevant industry trade shows, I’m always happy to provide feedback on anything from best practices to comprehensive marketing strategy. If I can be of assistance, feel free to reach out!

Jim Beckwith
[email protected]
847-803-2908

metalcasting design logo

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